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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

During the first day of jury selection at the federal fraud trial of Elizabeth Holmes, an incognito San Diego hotel magnate pulled a large Rice Krispie Treat from his pocket.

Loudly. So loudly, in fact, that the judge's voice was barely audible in the back of the courtroom over the sound of his wiggling the brick-shaped snack out of tightly-wrapped plastic.

"My name's Hanson," said the man, wearing a baseball cap and a Patagonia puffer jacket.

A federal judge on Friday issued a long-awaited ruling in Fortnite maker Epic Games' legal battle with Apple over its App Store policies.

Both sides are using the 185-page ruling to double down on their own positions, which is possible because the details are complicated.

If anything, though, Apple and Google did land small wins, but neither got what it wanted.

Updated September 11, 2021 at 12:07 PM ET

Six U.S. senators are calling for a federal probe into Amazon's treatment of pregnant employees at its warehouses. It's the latest push by lawmakers across the country to focus regulatory attention on the working conditions for the company's ballooning workforce.

Updated September 10, 2021 at 1:18 PM ET

A federal judge ordered Apple on Friday to crack open the tightly controlled App Store and allow people to use payment methods other than Apple's own processor, which usually collects a 30% commission on app purchases.

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Updated September 9, 2021 at 4:44 PM ET

Amazon is under pressure from Democrats in Congress over how its algorithms promote hoax COVID-19 cures, including the livestock dewormer ivermectin, as well as anti-vaccination claims and other medical misinformation.

"I shouldn't have waited."

In the final video posted on her TikTok account, Megan Alexandra Blankenbiller pleaded with her followers not to make the same mistake she did — waiting to get the COVID-19 vaccine — that eventually cost her her life.

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Jurors in the fraud trial of Elizabeth Holmes heard vastly different portrayals on Wednesday of the onetime whiz kid who amazed Silicon Valley with promises of biotech breakthroughs at her company, Theranos.

In a stinging opening statement on Wednesday, federal prosecutors described Holmes as a manipulative fraudster who duped investors and patients alike and knew the whole time that she was hoodwinking them.

Howard University in Washington, D.C., partially reopened Wednesday after a ransomware cyberattack forced the university to cancel Tuesday's classes.

In-person classes are resuming, while online and hybrid undergraduate courses remain suspended, according to a statement from the university.

El Salvador has become the first country in the world to make the cryptocurrency Bitcoin legal tender.

Advocates of the digital currency, including the country's president, Nayib Bukele, say the policy that took effect Tuesday morning was historic.

But the first few hours of Bitcoin's official status in El Salvador were marred by technological hiccups as the country opened its digital wallet app to residents and consumers for the first time.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

El Salvador this week officially became the first country in the world to adopt Bitcoin as legal tender. Tim Padgett of member station WLRN in Miami reports.

GoDaddy will no longer host a site set up by the Texas Right to Life to collect anonymous tips about when the state's new law banning almost all abortions was being violated.

The website promoted itself as a way to "help enforce the Texas Heartbeat Act," since the Texas law allows private citizens to sue anyone who performs or assists in an abortion after six weeks of pregnancy, before many women even know they are pregnant.

Ride-hailing apps Lyft and Uber said they will cover all the legal fees of any of their drivers who are sued under Texas's restrictive new abortion law.

Activists on TikTok are fighting back against Texas' new restrictive abortion law with spam.

Sean Black, who goes by @black_madness21 on TikTok, created a bot that makes it easy to submit fake tips to a "whistleblower" website created by the anti-abortion Texas Right to Life group.

Eight states will begin to roll out a new feature that will allow users to add their driver's license and state IDs to Apple Wallet for iPhone and Apple Watch.

Arizona and Georgia will be the first states to introduce the feature, Apple announced on Wednesday, with Connecticut, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Oklahoma and Utah to follow afterward.

The Democratic-led House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol has issued orders to 35 social media and communications companies to preserve records, as the panel continues to expand its probe into the deadly riot.

It's getting dangerously close to "game over" for some players in China: If you're under 18 and a fan of video games, you're now limited to just three hours of play a week.

In an effort to curb video game addiction among children, China's National Press and Publication Administration is tightening the reins on just how much that online gaming companies are allowed to offer young users, the nation's news agency Xinhua reported Monday.

Jury selection in the criminal fraud trial of Elizabeth Holmes starts on Tuesday, the beginning of a highly anticipated legal showdown over one of the most spectacular Silicon Valley scandals in recent history.

Federal prosecutors have charged Holmes and her former business partner and ex-boyfriend, Ramesh "Sunny" Balwani, with defrauding investors and patients of their blood-testing company Theranos, which Holmes and Balwani claimed would revolutionize laboratory medicine.

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Updated August 28, 2021 at 8:54 AM ET

Elizabeth Holmes, the founder of blood-testing startup Theranos, plans to defend herself at her federal fraud trial starting next week by arguing that her ex-boyfriend, who was an executive at the company, emotionally and sexually abused her, impairing her state of mind at the time of the alleged crimes, according to newly unsealed legal filings in her case.

Following four years of planning and research, the world's first 3D printed footbridge recently opened to the public in Europe.

The almost 40-foot bridge, unveiled last month, was built by Dutch company MX3D and will serve as a "living laboratory" in Amsterdam's city center.

Researchers and engineers at Imperial College London were able to 3D-print the bridge — which now serves pedestrians and cyclists crossing Amsterdam's Oudezijds Achterburgwal canal.

History is no game, but the developers of Fortnite are adding an iconic moment featuring Martin Luther King Jr. to the popular video game — and some people worry it sends the wrong message about the civil rights leader.

Steven Adair hunts hackers for a living. Back in January, in a corner-of-his-eye, peripheral kind of way, he thought he saw one in his customer's networks — a shadowy presence downloading emails.

Adair is the founder of a cybersecurity company called Volexity, and he runs traps to corner intruders all the time. So he took a quick look at a server his client was using to run Microsoft Exchange and was stunned to "see requests that we're not expecting," he said. There were requests for access to specific email accounts, requests for confidential files.

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The website OnlyFans is reversing a planned ban on pornography and other sexually explicit content.

Just days ago, the London-based company said that starting in October, it would block sexually explicit material, in response to concerns from banks and other financial services companies that enable transactions on the subscription service. It did not name the companies.

A news story suggesting the COVID-19 vaccine may have been involved in a doctor's death was the most viewed link on Facebook in the U.S. in the first three months of the year.

But Facebook held back from publishing a report with that information, the company acknowledged on Saturday.

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