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Joe Hernandez

A ceremonial cup from Turkey in the shape of a stag's head. Three death masks, likely unearthed from the mountains of Israel, dating back to 6000 or 7000 B.C. An ancient Greek chest for human remains.

Punishing rains over the Hawaiian islands have produced gusty winds and flash flooding throughout the state, with weather warnings still in effect as of Tuesday morning.

Updated December 6, 2021 at 8:11 PM ET

City officials in San Francisco want to delay the imposition of a tax on lawful recreational cannabis businesses to help them compete with illegal marijuana dealers.

When CNN fired prime-time star Chris Cuomo on Saturday, the network cited new information casting a fresh and harsh light on his efforts to aid his brother, former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, in combating sexual harassment allegations.

Yet CNN's actions came just a day after a prominent Washington, D.C., workplace attorney arranged to share materials supporting accusations by a former colleague of Cuomo at ABC News that he had sexually harassed her there.

The Kellogg Company and the union for roughly 1,400 of its cereal plant workers have reached a tentative agreement on a new contract, ending a nearly two-month strike.

The food giant and the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union announced the deal on Thursday, with workers set to vote on the proposal on Sunday.

The company was "pleased" to reach the agreement and thanked the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service for helping in the negotiations, Kellogg spokesperson Kris Bahner said in a statement.

The gang breaks a record!

With the debut of its 15th season this week, It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia just became the longest-running live-action sitcom in U.S. TV history, FX said.

"So, raise that snifter and cheers: To Sunny!" the TV channel said. "Yes, it burns a little, and that's what you want."

The next time someone tries to friend you on Facebook or follow you on Instagram, it could be a debt collector.

New rules approved by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau that took effect on Tuesday dictate how collection agencies can email and text people as well as message them on social media to seek repayment for unpaid debts.

Member states of the World Health Organization are banding together to make a plan to deal with future pandemics like the COVID-19 outbreak.

A new report paints a bleak picture of the global tourism industry's ongoing recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, predicting that revenues in 2021 will only slightly improve on last year's historic losses.

The United Nations World Tourism Organization estimates that the contribution of tourism to the world economy this year will be $1.9 trillion — a slight improvement over last year's $1.6 trillion but still far lower than the $3.5 trillion the industry earned in 2019.

Conservationists flew 30 white rhinos from South Africa to Rwanda last week in what they say is the largest single rhino translocation ever.

The roughly 2,000-mile journey took the rhinos to their new home in Akagera National Park, where advocates hope the animals will be able to establish a new breeding stronghold and evade the rampant poaching that's put their species in danger.

African leaders are pushing back on travel bans imposed by wealthy or Western nations in an effort to stop the spread of the highly transmissible omicron variant — and expressing their anger that the result of South Africa's openness in sharing news of the variant has led to what they see as punitive measures.

The variant was detected last week in Botswana and South Africa, and since then it's been found in countries across the globe from Scotland to Canada. It's still unclear where the latest known strain originated.

Updated November 22, 2021 at 7:32 PM ET

Defense attorneys for the three men charged with killing Ahmaud Arbery in Glynn County, Ga., in February 2020, wrapped up their closing arguments on Monday, but the prosecution's rebuttal has been pushed back a day.

Prosecuting attorneys had intended to give their response to the defense's closing arguments, but after jurors were told the state would need an additional two hours for its rebuttal, the panel asked to be released for the day.

Updated November 22, 2021 at 1:27 PM ET

About 80 people rushed into a Nordstrom store near San Francisco on Saturday and stole merchandise in what authorities called an "organized theft."

Police in Walnut Creek said Sunday that they arrested three people in connection with the incident at the luxury department store, including one person allegedly in possession of a gun.

The U.S. is approaching its second Thanksgiving in the COVID-19 pandemic, and cases are rising again.

The CDC reported that, as of Thursday, the seven-day daily average of new infections was 88,482, a 16.1% jump over the prior week.

Public health experts say families that are fully vaccinated can enjoy a normal Thanksgiving together, and they're urging those who have not yet gotten the shot to do so.

Here are some other coronavirus updates:

Ann Arbor will require all public restrooms in the city to carry menstrual products under a new ordinance that takes effect in January.

It means pads and tampons, as well as soap and toilet paper, will have to be available for free in every public restroom throughout the Michigan city.

West Coast night owls and East Coast early risers will have the best view of the upcoming lunar eclipse this Friday.

Overnight, the moon will pass into the shadow of Earth cast by the sun, illuminating the gray orb with a red hue. It will be the second and final eclipse of the year.

This is your creepy-crawly warning. Read on at your own risk.

A zoo in Australia has acquired what officials there say is the largest funnel web spider they've ever seen.

Measuring in at 8 centimeters (a little more than 3 inches), the so-called megaspider possesses a potentially deadly bite with fangs strong enough to pierce through a human fingernail.

A massive wind and rain storm that began Friday is causing flooding and mudslides in the Pacific Northwest near the Canadian border, leading to the closure of an interstate highway, evacuations and power outages.

On Monday, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee declared a severe weather state of emergency for 14 counties in the western part of the state.

Raquel Coronell Uribe, a history and literature major from Miami, will become the Harvard Crimson's first Latinx president in the student newspaper's 148-year history. She takes the helm in January.

"It's a huge honor," Coronell told NPR. "Even if it took 148 years, I'm thrilled that I get to be in the position to be that first person."

You know what they say about birds of a feather.

A pair of bald eagles was recently caught on camera entangled, talons seemingly interlocked, on a Minnesota street.

The two birds writhed around together and at times cried out, but for minutes they were unable to separate themselves from each other.

"I don't know what to do with them," Plymouth police officer Mitchell Martinson can be heard saying in body camera video recorded at the scene. "They're definitely locked together, kind of out of energy."

Don't bet against Julia "Hurricane" Hawkins.

The retired Louisiana teacher just became the first female track and field athlete in the 105+ age bracket to clock a time in the 100-meter dash.

Hawkins crossed the finish line in 1:02:95, a slightly slower time than she'd hoped for.

"It was wonderful to see so many family members and friends. But I wanted to do it in less than a minute," she said after the race, according to the National Senior Games Association.

Toyota, one of the world's largest vehicle manufacturers, said it will increase production in December as it recovers from parts shortages caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Japanese automaker announced it expects to build 800,000 vehicles globally next month, up from the roughly 760,000 it made last December.

The company also said it was maintaining its forecast of producing 9 million vehicles in the current fiscal year, which ends March 31. Toyota produced about 7.6 million units in the previous fiscal year.

The Justice Department is suing the ride-hailing company Uber for charging "wait time" fees it says unfairly harm people with disabilities.

According to federal prosecutors, Uber charges an extra fee starting two minutes after a car arrives until the trip starts and that discriminates against people with disabilities who may need more time to get in a vehicle.

The owner of a California-based solar energy company has been sentenced to 30 years in federal prison for bilking investors in a billion-dollar Ponzi scheme, prosecutors say.

Jeff Carpoff, 50, previously pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit wire fraud and money laundering in January 2020.

A group of governments, automakers and others have signed on to an agreement to transition to 100% zero-emission sales of new cars and vans by 2040 globally and by 2035 in "leading markets."

The prosecution has rested its case in the murder trial of Kyle Rittenhouse, who's accused of two homicides and another attempted homicide during protests in Kenosha, Wis. last year.

Rittenhouse, now 18, shot and killed Joseph Rosenbaum, 36, and Anthony Huber, 26, and injured Gaige Grosskreutz during a racial justice protest on the night of Aug. 25, 2020. Rittenhouse has pleaded not guilty to the charges.

A new study suggests that people who face discrimination at a young age are more likely to develop behavioral and mental health problems later in life.

And the risks may be cumulative; those who faced more incidents of discrimination had an even higher risk of future problems, researchers found.

Updated November 8, 2021 at 4:41 PM ET

The NFL is batting away a claim by Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers that a league doctor told him people vaccinated against COVID-19 couldn't contract or spread the virus.

Rodgers made the claim in an appearance Friday on "The Pat McAfee Show" on Friday, defending his decision to not get vaccinated and criticizing the league for how it's treated unvaccinated players.

Authorities in Kentucky say they arrested a 61-year-old man and rescued an underage girl from his car after a motorist saw her using a hand gesture popularized on the social media platform TikTok last year.

Updated November 7, 2021 at 2:07 PM ET

The iconic New York City Marathon got underway in person on Sunday for the first time since it was cancelled last year and turned into a virtual event due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

This year's race saw a raft of new health and safety measures to prevent the massive competition from turning into a superspreader event.

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