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Elena Burnett

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The American economy wants you to buy, especially at this time of year.

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UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: This Cyber Monday is your last chance to score big online.

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Updated December 1, 2021 at 9:01 AM ET

Cyber Monday and Black Friday are behind us for the year, but the holiday shopping season isn't over just yet. It's always been a time when Americans buy more, but nearly two years into the COVID-19 pandemic, and Americans are spending way more — outsize amounts of money on things.

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A new essay titled "Black Cop's Kid" touches on an experience that sounds recent - news of a Black teenager killed by a white police officer and seeing the violent clashes between protesters and law enforcement that ensued.

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Not long ago, Denver Public Schools nurse Rebecca Sposato was packing up her office at the end of a difficult school year. She remembers looking around at all her cleaning supplies and extra masks and thinking, "What am I going to do with all this stuff?"

It was May, when vaccine appointments were opening up for the majority of adults and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were loosening mask guidance.

"I honestly thought we were trending down in our COVID numbers, trending up in our vaccine numbers," she says. "And I thought the worst was over."

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Remember that phone call? July 25, 2019, the president of Ukraine speaking with the then-president of the United States.

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DONALD TRUMP: It was beautiful. It was just a perfect conversation.

Soccer player Megan Rapinoe, swimmer Katie Ledecky and gymnast Simone Biles are among the 11,000 athletes competing in the Tokyo Olympics beginning this week on July 23.

More than 600 athletes from across the U.S. are headed to Japan to represent Team USA, and they'll have to navigate the twists and turns of this year's unusual Olympic Games.

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After their two-hour CBS interview in March, Oprah Winfrey and Prince Harry, the Duke of Sussex, have a new documentary series together on Apple TV+. It's called The Me You Can't See.

The series focuses on the importance of mental health and on what it's like to struggle with it. The Me You Can't See tells the stories of both regular people and famous people, including Lady Gaga, Glenn Close and Prince Harry himself.

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This spring Steve Stuttard reunited with an unusual friend: Mrs. Mallard, a duck that nested in the fuchsia planter on his ninth-story apartment balcony in Manchester, U.K., last year. Upon her return, she laid 11 eggs in a planter filled with grass.

"I know ducks have strange routines when it comes to nesting, and mallards, if they have a successful site, they will return to it," says Stuttard, a retired Royal Navy survival specialist and an avid bird lover since childhood.

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Look. I wouldn't know what to do if a duck started nesting in a planter on my ninth floor balcony, but Steve Stuttard, an avid bird lover and retired Royal Navy specialist, was just the man for the job.

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