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Christopher Intagliata

Introducing the amazing spring-loaded larva.
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There's a new move in gymnastics unlike any that's come before.

The jazz and lounge music world has lost one of its most iconic personalities. Marty Roberts — one half of the married lounge act "Marty & Elayne" died last week, at 89.

For decades, the duo performed five to six nights a week — Marty on drums and vocals, Elayne on piano and flute.

They were fixtures at the Los Angeles bar and restaurant The Dresden Room — with its retro red booths and stiff cocktails — where they played an eclectic mix of jazz standards, original numbers and their own twists on pop hits.

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The jazz and lounge music world has lost one of its most iconic personalities. Marty Roberts, one half of the married lounge act Marty & Elayne, died last week at 89.

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In the most recent season of the Apple TV show "Ted Lasso," a player on the fictional AFC Richmond Premier League soccer team has a dilemma.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "TED LASSO")

The U.S. is now averaging more than 400,000 new COVID-19 cases a day. This comes after a week where new case counts shattered the previous day's records again and again. And even those staggering numbers are probably an undercount.

Rochelle Walensky, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, told NPR last week that with so many people testing at home, it is hard to capture the true number of cases.

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On January 1, some 400,000 songs, speeches and sound effects entered the public domain. The sounds were all recorded before 1923 and include oddities like this.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Amid the omicron surge, there is understandable anxiety among parents, particularly those with kids under 5 who can't yet get a COVID-19 vaccine.

They're wondering how to navigate life with young children, what this means for travel plans and day care, and when the vaccine will become available.

Ibukun Kalu is a pediatric infectious disease doctor at Duke University and says her hospital has already seen a rise in children being admitted.

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'Tis the season - mushroom season, that is. A pair of fungus foragers, who live in California's Humboldt County - that's north of San Francisco - recently pulled in more than 200 pounds of chanterelles.

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The word millipede literally means thousand feet. And yet, for years, millipedes have been masquerading under a name that didn't quite fit, says entomologist Paul Marek of Virginia Tech.

Soccer games that make you sit on the edge of your seat may be a thing of the past, according to new scientific research.

After analyzing 26 years worth of European soccer matches, in 11 major European soccer leagues, scientists have determined the games have become more predictable over time — and the home field advantage has vanished. The work appears in the journal Royal Society Open Science.

After analyzing 26 years worth of European soccer matches, scientists have determined that the games have become more predictable over time — and the home field advantage has vanished.

Victor Martins Maimone and Taha Yasseri, Football is becoming more predictable; Network analysis of 88 thousands matches in 11 major leagues

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What's it like trying to get nearly 200 countries to agree on something? Well, Alok Sharma recently found out. He's president of COP26, the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference, which wrapped up in Glasgow, Scotland, last month.

It's the most wonderful time of the year, as they say. That is, unless you ordered the latest gadget too late, and now it's stuck in supply chain limbo.

Or if you are the kind of person who leaves their shopping until it's down to the wire, like Daniel Gritzer, the culinary director of Serious Eats.

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By analyzing white lead paint in Dutch paintings from the 1600s, including works by Rembrandt and Rubens, scientists were able to devise a new line of evidence for dating and authenticating paintings.

P. D'Imporzano et al, Time-dependent variation of lead isotopes of lead white in 17th century Dutch paintings

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For nearly a decade, scientists have been eavesdropping on killer whales in the Arctic.

(SOUNDBITE OF KILLER WHALES CALLING)

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Researchers at Microsoft have developed a faster way to write data into DNA — a biological alternative to the bits on a hard drive.

Bichlien H. Nguyen et al, Scaling DNA data storage with nanoscale electrode wells

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As the climate changes, our seasons are changing, too.

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Thanksgiving is almost here and, perhaps, you're planning to brave the deep fryer.

You've got the oil. You've got the pan. You've got the fire. You should be good to go, right?

But, how do you know the oil is ready?

Researchers in the field of fluid dynamics have a trick – use your ears.

The scientists were inspired by a classic kitchen hack, used to test tempura-frying oil. You wet the pointy end of a wooden chopstick, stick it into the oil, and listen.

Scientists have found something strange has been happening among sensitive bird species in the Brazilian Amazon in recent years.

Not only were the birds declining in number, but their bodies were also shrinking in size.

"We found that size is not only shrinking for those sensitive species — it was declining for everyone," said researcher Vitek Jirinec of Louisiana State University.

Jirinec's findings are contained in a new study published in the journal Science Advances last Friday.

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In recent years, scientists found something strange was happening among sensitive bird species in the Brazilian Amazon. Not only were the birds declining in number, but their bodies were shrinking in size.

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The United States has seen a decline in cases and hospitalizations since the summer's delta surge — but the decline is declining.

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