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Ari Shapiro

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In 1997, the writer Antoine Wilson was visiting Seattle. He was down by the water with some friends.

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The new movie The Lost Daughter shows a side of motherhood that Hollywood doesn't often depict.

Its main character Leda (played by Olivia Colman) is not a monstrous parent or a saint. She's ambivalent. She has two daughters in their 20s and is a divorced middle-aged literature professor on a "working vacation" in Greece.

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The new movie, "The Lost Daughter," shows a sign of motherhood that Hollywood doesn't often depict. Leda, played by Olivia Colman, is not a monstrous parent or a saint. She's ambivalent.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "THE LOST DAUGHTER")

A second winter of COVID is descending upon the United States.

This time there is widespread access to vaccines, but there's also the new omicron variant, a much more infectious form of the coronavirus that's surging.

Health care workers in hospitals are seeing the worst of the pandemic every day. But is anything all that different with this latest variant? To find out, All Things Considered spoke with three nurses from around the country to talk about their experiences.

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Dustin Stockton and Jennifer Lynn Lawrence spent years as cheerleaders and organizers for Donald Trump while traveling the country in an RV.

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What's it like trying to get nearly 200 countries to agree on something? Well, Alok Sharma recently found out. He's president of COP26, the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference, which wrapped up in Glasgow, Scotland, last month.

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Scientists and world leaders have warned from the beginning of the pandemic that nobody is safe until the entire world is vaccinated against the coronavirus. Here's how President Biden put it on Monday.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

On the day we visit Jeneyah McDonald, she has five pallets' worth of bottled water in a corner of her kitchen.

"Oh, that's low," she says.

McDonald buys more every week for cooking, drinking and brushing teeth. She also has a filter on her tap. She checks the light to see it remains green.

"I try and keep a clear glass by the sink so I can fill it up to see with some paper behind it," she says. "I mean, who else is doing that?"

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And we are joined now by Ahmaud Arbery's father, Marcus Arbery, and family attorney Ben Crump.

Thank you both for being with us today.

BEN CRUMP: Thank you for having us.

MARCUS ARBERY: Yes.

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At 3 a.m. on Saturday, June 26, Theresa Bonham awoke to a phone call.

"My neighbor across the street called me and asked me if I had been in the basement," says Bonham, 52, who lives in the Jefferson Chalmers neighborhood of Detroit. She assumed the neighbor had seen someone trying to break in.

"So I get up and I open the basement door, and I see a bucket float by. And I'm like, 'Oh my God'."

That night, six inches of rain fell in Detroit within three hours. The heaviest downpour hit the low-lying southeastern parts of the city where Bonham lives.

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The United States and China — the world's top two greenhouse gas-emitting countries, which together account for about 40% of the world's annual carbon output — announced Wednesday they have agreed to cooperate on limiting emissions to address the global climate crisis.

At the COP26 U.N. climate summit, some of those with the most to lose insist they aren't victims, they're warriors.

"As a Pacific Islander, a lot of people think my role here at COP is to come and cry, like I owe them my trauma, when I don't owe you my trauma," said 23-year-old Brianna Fruean, a climate activist from Samoa.

Fruean opened the first day of the summit in Glasgow, Scotland, speaking directly to the heads of state from all over the world.

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