KRWG

Mallory Falk

Multimedia Reporter

Mallory Falk joined KRWG in June, 2018 as a Report for America corps member. She covers a wide range of issues in the region, including education, healthcare, economic development, and the environment. Mallory previously served as education reporter at WWNO, New Orleans Public Radio, where her coverage won multiple awards. Her stories have aired on regional and national programs like Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Here & Now, and Texas Standard.

Mallory Falk / KRWG

Shortly after Donald Trump was elected, a new grassroots movement formed. It’s called Indivisible, and it has thousands of chapters all over the United States. The founders, former congressional staffers, studied how Tea Party members blocked much of President Obama’s agenda. They created a manual for progressives, encouraging them to use similar tactics to resist President Trump. Now, as the midterm elections draw near, their work is evolving.

Domenici Conference

Immigration reform is a huge topic right now. But what kind of reform do Americans actually want? A new poll from the Bipartisan Policy Center tries to answer that question. Theresa Cardinal Brown is the center's director of immigration and cross-border policy. She was in town for the 11th Annual Domenici Public Policy Conference, and sat down with KRWG after her presentation to discuss the survey results.

Stampede Facility / Sunland Park

New Mexico is short on jobs. One way it’s trying to address that is attracting companies to the state. Sometimes that means giving them financial incentives to move or expand here. That’s part of how New Mexico swayed Stampede Meat - a meat processing and production company - to open a new plant here.

Mallory Falk

 

 

Congressman Beto O’Rourke has been seemingly everywhere lately. Campaigning across Texas. Blowing up on the internet, with a video defending NFL players’ right to kneel during the National Anthem. Even making a guest appearance on the Ellen Show. But will all this attention translate to votes? O’Rourke has drawn large crowds at town halls across Texas, including in his hometown, El Paso. That city is solidly blue, but it also has low voter turnout. Will O’Rourke’s bid for Senate bring more local voters to the polls?

Mallory Falk / KRWG

It’s back to school time. Across New Mexico, students are zipping up new backpacks, memorizing locker combinations, and in some cases, walking into classrooms with substitute teachers. There’s a national teacher shortage, and New Mexico is feeling the effect. Many districts here are struggling to hire enough teachers. One local district is trying to tackle the problem.

 

Mallory Falk / KRWG

Las Cruces schools are back in session. And for the first time, some classrooms are filled with the tiniest learners: pre-kindergarteners. Las Cruces Public Schools is one of 11 districts across the state that just launched New Mexico PreK, a state-funded program for four-year-olds. Other districts expanded the program. The new seats help fill a gap in early childhood education. 

Mallory Falk / KRWG

Las Cruces police are revealing more information about an officer-involved shooting earlier this month that left 29-year-old James Bishop dead.

On the evening of August 3rd, James Bishop’s father called 911. According to a family statement, Bishop “suffered a mental health episode.” They hoped police could get him under control and transport him to the hospital.

At a press conference on Wednesday, Police Chief Patrick Gallagher described what happened next. He said two officers arrived at the Bishop home.

The Trump administration is making it harder for migrants to gain asylum in the U.S. Recently, Attorney General Jeff Sessions ruled that most migrants fleeing domestic or gang violence no longer qualify for protection. But asylum seekers here in the borderlands already faced long odds.


Across the country, lawyers and advocates are working with government officials to reunite parents and children separated at the U.S.-Mexico border. Over half of the children under the age of 5 were reunited this past week. Thousands more face a court-ordered deadline for reunification by the end of this month. 

Across the country, lawyers and advocates are working with U.S. government officials to reunite parents and children who were separated at the U.S.-Mexico border. Over half of the children under the age of five were reunited this past week. Thousands more face a court-ordered deadline for reunification by the end of this month.

Taylor Levy is the legal coordinator for Annunciation House, a migrant shelter in El Paso, Texas. She and her team are trying to help about 50 parents reunite with their children.