KRWG

Astor Piazzolla

Leora Zeitlin

Three dozen Las Cruces students will make their concert debut this weekend as the newly-formed Las Cruces Youth Orchestra, fulfilling a dream of Simon Gollo, founder of the orchestra and violin professor at NMSU. “We need to have more kids making music,” Gollo told Intermezzo host Leora Zeitlin in this interview. Gollo and several faculty members have been training the students for three hours every Saturday this fall. “[The Las Cruces Youth Orchestra] is a wonderful program.

Leora Zeitlin

One of the foremost composers of our day, Osvaldo Golijov grew up in Argentina when Astor Piazzolla was composing and performing his famous tangos worldwide. After Piazzolla’s death, Golijov wrote a work for nine string players called “Last Round” that pays tribute to his fellow Argentinian composer. His goal was to “imitate the wonderful, amazing, beautiful sound of Astor Piazzolla’s bandoneon,” said Daniel Vega-Albela, speaking of the small accordion-like instrument that Piazzolla made famous.

Two concerts to feature music from South America

Nov 4, 2019
Leora Zeitlin

If you’ve never heard music by Camargo Guarnieri, Francisco Mignone or Astor Piazzolla, then this week is your chance to hear and learn about some of South America’s greatest composers in two free concerts. And if you do know their work, you’ll already know there’s a treat in store. On Thursday, visiting guest pianist Justin Badgerow will present a recital of classical music from Brazil, including by Mignone, Villa-Lobos, Milhaud and Guarnieri.

Leora Zeitlin

Philippe Quint’s childhood dreams were to become a world-class chess player, soccer star, or perhaps a cosmonaut (he was born in what was then Leningrad, Russia) not necessarily a professional violinist. But at 13 – he began playing at the age of four – he went to Moscow to study at a school for talented young musicians, and there he found “the perfect ground” to develop his craft and a path to a musical career.

Leora Zeitlin

It was in a shoe store that Sara Sant’Ambrogio’s destiny as a cellist emerged. She had begged her parents for a cello, but they thought she was too small. Then the five-year-old went to get her first pair of school shoes, and discovered her feet were bigger than her older sister’s, Sant’Ambrogio told Intermezzo host Leora Zeitlin. When her mother told her father, he said, “'Really, hold your hands out,' and I held my hands out and he realized how massive my hands were – they looked like ET – and the next day, I got a cello. And I was so happy.”