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Laurel Wamsley

Updated November 23, 2021 at 6:49 PM ET

Jurors have wrapped up the first day of deliberations without reaching a verdict in the case of the three men accused of murder and other charges over the killing of Ahmaud Arbery in Glynn County, Ga., in February 2020.

The nearly all-white jury entered deliberations Tuesday and after five hours and 15 minutes, said they were finished for the evening. They will resume debating the charges tomorrow at 8:30 a.m. CT.

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Voters in St. Paul, Minn., passed one of the most restrictive rent control ordinances in the country. It's one of several cities reviving interest in an old but controversial way to limit housing costs. NPR's Laurel Wamsley reports.

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Jonathan Eta had managed to keep his head above water after he lost his job as an auto detailer in Southern California at the start of the pandemic. But last month, the emergency unemployment benefits he relied on expired.

"Basically, now we're just out on our own, you know?" he says.

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Seventeen people from a Christian aid mission who were abducted in Haiti over the weekend are still missing. They were with an organization called Christian Aid Ministries, based in Ohio. NPR's Laurel Wamsley is following the situation.

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The pandemic is taking an uneven economic toll on Americans. Black and Latino families have taken the biggest hits. As NPR's Laurel Wamsley reports, many have seen their hard-won financial progress swept away.

The seventeen people from an Christian aid mission abducted in Haiti while returning from an orphanage remain missing, four days later.

Their kidnapping – brazen even in a country where abductions have increased exponentially recently – have cast a spotlight on the work that religious relief organizations undertake in sometimes dangerous conditions.

Indeed, such aid groups are often found in the parts of the world where conditions are most dire.

Updated October 11, 2021 at 10:54 PM ET

Jon Gruden, the coach of the Las Vegas Raiders, has resigned following news reports that he used derogatory language in emails dating back to 2011.

A small plane crashed into a residential neighborhood in southern California, killing at least two people. Footage from the scene showed burned homes and a charred delivery truck in the city of Santee, a suburb northeast of San Diego.

A UPS delivery driver was among those killed in the crash, the company confirmed to NPR.

The plane, a twin-engine Cessna C340, crashed into the neighborhood at about 12:14 p.m. local time on Monday.

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Former Facebook employee Frances Haugen testified before a Senate commerce subcommittee on Tuesday, saying that the company's research proved how damaging its platforms can be to the mental health of teens.

Updated October 4, 2021 at 12:51 PM ET

Brittany Watson worked as a nurse at the hospital in Winchester, Va. — until her employer, Valley Health, announced that all staff must get vaccinated.

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Updated September 14, 2021 at 5:19 PM ET

Poverty in the United States fell last year, even amid the impact of the pandemic, due to government aid, including relief payments and unemployment insurance. That's according to new data just released by the U.S. Census Bureau.

The Supplemental Poverty Measure rate in 2020 was 9.1%, 2.6 percentage points lower than that rate in 2019.

In a courthouse in Memphis, Tenn., a full docket of cases means tenants are packed into eviction court – as much as social distancing will allow, and then a little more. When each tenant is called up for their case, Judge Phyllis Gardner asks this question: "Are you interested in the rental assistance program?"

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TOKYO — We're in the home stretch of the most dramatic Olympics in recent memory, held against great odds amid a global pandemic in a country where many Japanese residents didn't want it to happen at all.

An ocean expedition exploring more than a mile under the surface of the Atlantic captured a startlingly silly sight this week: a sponge that looked very much like SpongeBob SquarePants.

And right next to it, a pink sea star — a doppelganger for Patrick, SpongeBob's dim-witted best friend.

When revising its mask guidance this week to urge even vaccinated people to wear masks indoors in much of the country, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was criticized for not citing data in making that move.

Now it has — and the data is sobering.

For some of us, the Olympics don't really get started until the runners take the starting line and the javelins go flying.

With the Olympics underway, Tokyo has set a new, unfortunate record: for coronavirus cases.

Tokyo had 3,177 new positive cases on Tuesday, according to the city's government. The city has become Japan's biggest COVID-19 hot spot and is host to most of the Olympic events.

When Simone Biles suddenly pulled out of the team final after a vault that went awry, her teammate Jordan Chiles was thrust into the clutch.

Chiles, 20, had been slated to compete for Team USA in just two events in the team final: vault and floor. But with Biles out of the competition, she was suddenly competing on the balance beam and uneven bars too.

Protests by athletes have become common and more widely embraced in the last few years, and the Olympics has updated its rules to allow for it – within limits.

Pictogram people become unlikely MVPs

One of the most striking sequences in the Tokyo Olympics' opening ceremony revolved around pictograms. Tokyo organizers have been touting their "kinetic pictograms," which show figures bursting into motion across dozens of disciplines. For Friday's ceremony, they brought all 50 of those pictograms to life.

While the delta variant of the coronavirus has quickly become the dominant strain in the United States, it's not the only variant circulating in the population.

Updated July 20, 2021 at 12:47 PM ET

Wearing a cowboy hat under the West Texas morning sun, Jeff Bezos crossed the bridge to enter the capsule made by his company Blue Origin. He was accompanied by three others – his brother Mark Bezos, female aviation pioneer Wally Funk and 18-year-old Oliver Daemen.

Then the shuttle hatch closed and just before 9:15 a.m. ET, the four blasted into space on the first human flight on Blue Origin's New Shepard launch vehicle.

England has lifted most of its domestic COVID-19 restrictions, marking a milestone as the country moves into a new phase of pandemic life — what some have dubbed "Freedom Day."

Young people gathered at nightclubs just after midnight to celebrate the return of crowds to raucous indoor spaces. "This is what life's about," one clubgoer said.

Richard Branson, the British billionaire, plans to blast into space on Sunday from New Mexico aboard a rocket made by his company Virgin Galactic.

Nine days later, Amazon founder Jeff Bezos is scheduled to rocket into space from West Texas in a capsule made by his company Blue Origin.

In many ways, American life is returning to normalcy: Masks are no longer required in many locations, schools and universities are slated to reopen and the days of social distancing have begun to fade as

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