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By now, you've probably heard about Larry Nassar, the former doctor for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University. He was sentenced to up to 175 years in prison for sexually abusing dozens of girls and young women, all under the guise of providing medical treatment. The first person to publicly accuse Nassar of sexual abuse was former gymnast Rachael Denhollander. She writes about her experience in a new memoir called "What Is A Girl Worth" and a children's book called "How Much Is A Little Girl Worth?"

UAW Votes To Strike

10 hours ago

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By now, you've probably heard about Larry Nassar, the former doctor for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University. He was sentenced to up to 175 years in prison for sexually abusing dozens of girls and young women, all under the guise of providing medical treatment. The first person to publicly accuse Nassar of sexual abuse was former gymnast Rachael Denhollander. She writes about her experience in a new memoir called "What Is A Girl Worth" and a children's book called "How Much Is A Little Girl Worth?"

Updated at 4:51 p.m. ET

Yemen's Houthi rebels have claimed responsibility for drone strikes on two Saudi Aramco oil facilities early Saturday, according to a statement by a Houthi spokesman.

On a hot June day in Fort Scott, Kan., as the Good Ol' Days festival was in full swing, 7-year-old Kaidence Anderson sat in the shade with her family, waiting for a medevac helicopter to land.

A crowd had gathered to see the display prearranged by staff at the town's historic fort.

"It's going to show us how it's going to help other people because we don't have the hospital anymore," the redheaded girl explained.

A federal appeals court Friday reinstated a lawsuit against Fox News and two other defendants over its coverage of the death of Seth Rich, a 27-year-old Democratic Party aide who was murdered in July 2016.

Uber's bright red Jump bikes will no longer be seen on the streets of San Diego and Atlanta.

The company has confirmed it will soon pull its ride-share bikes from those two cities. Over the summer, both San Diego and Atlanta ratcheted up regulations on shareable bikes and electric scooters.

The company's bikes are also temporarily unavailable in Providence, R.I., according to Uber spokesman Matthew Wing. The company also stopped bike-sharing in Dallas and San Antonio earlier this summer, after announcing it would close down in Staten Island, N.Y.

Updated at 9:35 p.m. ET

New York state Attorney General Letitia James says the family that owns Purdue Pharma, maker of the opioid OxyContin, used Swiss bank accounts to transfer $1 billion from the company to itself.

The allegation, which came in court documents filed late Friday, indicates that the Sackler family is trying to keep its wealth free from potential liability in other court cases involving Purdue Pharma's role in the opioid crisis.

Friday News Roundup - International

Sep 13, 2019

With guest host Todd Zwillich.

In the northern Bahamas, 2,500 people are still missing in the wake of Hurricane Dorian. The Catagory 5 storm left at least 50 people dead. The death toll is expected to rise.

For Shadrack Frimpong, 28, finding himself a recipient of a 2019 Muhammad Ali Humanitarian Award "feels pretty crazy," he says, "because here we have a kid who grew up in the middle of the forest in rural Ghana being compared to someone who really was the greatest of all time."

He is one of six recipients of the annual award, given to advocates and activists for social change who are under 30. The awards were presented Sept. 12 in Louisville, Ky.

Regulate us. That's the unexpected message from one of the country's leading tech executives. Microsoft President Brad Smith argues that governments need to put some "guardrails" around engineers and the tech titans they serve.

If public leaders don't, he says, the Internet giants will cannibalize the very fabric of this country.

"We need to work together; we need to work with governments to protect, frankly, something that is far more important than technology: democracy. It was here before us. It needs to be here and healthy after us," Smith says.

Utility giant PG&E has agreed to a second large settlement over devastating Northern California wildfires, saying it will pay $11 billion to resolve most insurance claims from the wine country fires in 2017 and massive Camp Fire in 2018.

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology has reached an agreement in principle to settle a lawsuit that alleged that MIT, one of the nation's most prestigious universities, hurt workers in its retirement plan by engaging in an improper relationship with the financial firm Fidelity Investments.

Attorneys for Virginia's Democratic lieutenant governor, Justin Fairfax, filed a $400 million defamation lawsuit against CBS on Thursday, accusing the network of amplifying sexual assault claims that Fairfax says are "false, defamatory and politically-motivated."

The lawsuit centers on CBS This Morning's airing of two interviews with Meredith Watson and Vanessa Tyson, who in February accused Fairfax of separate incidents of sexual assault.

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Why do you work? Popular wisdom says your answer depends on what your job is.

But psychologist Amy Wrzesniewski at Yale University finds it may have more to do with how we think about our work.

Democrats running for president next year have worked hard to differentiate themselves from President Trump on issues such as immigration, tax cuts and health care. When it comes to trade, that hasn't been so easy.

Trump, after all, came to office as a fierce critic of U.S. trade policy, arguing that previous administrations had been duped into signing free trade agreements that had cost Americans millions of manufacturing jobs.

Lyft is facing a flood of lawsuits from women around the country who say the ride-hailing company has known for years — and failed to stop — what they describe as an epidemic of sexual assault and rape involving some of its drivers.

"This is out of control. And this needs to stop," says attorney Laurel Simes, a partner in a San Francisco firm representing several dozen women who are suing the company.

The CEOs of 145 companies issued a new call for gun safety Thursday, sending a letter to members of the Senate on Thursday stating that it is "simply unacceptable" to do nothing about gun violence and mass shootings in the U.S.

Saying the country is in a public health crisis, the CEOs say new laws that would require background checks on all gun sales "are a common-sense solution with overwhelming public support and are a critical step toward stemming the gun violence epidemic in this country."

General Motors workers made big concessions to help pull the automaker out of its 2009 bankruptcy. Now, the company is making record profits.

But, the Warren Transmission plant in Michigan shut its doors at the tail end of June, and most of the workers have been placed at other plants. It's a ghost factory.

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Detroit automakers are bracing for a possible strike. The United Auto Workers Union is set to renegotiate their contract, and it could get contentious. Michigan Radio's Tracy Samilton has the view from outside a shuttered General Motors plant in Warren, Mich.

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The southern border is effectively closed to the vast majority of migrants who are seeking asylum in the U.S.

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Jack Ma, the billionaire founder of China's e-commerce giant Alibaba, likes to say the key to his success is the people he hires.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Note: An updated version of the letter, with additional signatures, was published Sept. 13.

"We blew it."

That was Forbes editor Randall Lane's assessment on Twitter after his publication released a list of America's 100 most innovative leaders that included only a single woman.

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