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Rwandans born of rape during genocide face harsh stigma, even 3 decades on

Second-generation survivors born from rapes committed during the 1994 Genocide Against the Tutsi in Rwanda find healing, community, and advocacy at a Foundation Rwanda Counseling Camp. The camps offer participants counseling, career guidance, and reproductive health education. (Serrah Galos/ Foundation Rwanda)
Second-generation survivors born from rapes committed during the 1994 Genocide Against the Tutsi in Rwanda find healing, community, and advocacy at a Foundation Rwanda Counseling Camp. The camps offer participants counseling, career guidance, and reproductive health education. (Serrah Galos/ Foundation Rwanda)

Editor’s note: This story contains descriptions of rape and sexual assault.

Rwanda has been marking three decades since the genocide which caused mass atrocities across the central African nation. In those 30 years, much has been done to address the horrors and brutality faced by members of the Tutsi minority ethnic group, as well as some moderate Hutu and Twa at the hands of Hutu militia.

Many people were born of rape during the 100 days of violence and to this day still face societal stigma for how they were conceived.

Host Deepa Fernandes speaks to Intare, one of the many people born of rape during the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi. Intare, who will turn 30 next year, shares challenges related to their unique trauma and the specific challenges faced by people like them.

They are joined by another Rwandan Samuel Munderere, who is a program director for Foundation Rwanda, to talk about what needs to be done to stop the stigmatization and abuse of people like Intare.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

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