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Copyright 2021 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Bad predictions are an occupational hazard for forecasters. And, on this front, the late futurist Alvin Toffler was not immune. Human cloning by the 1980s? Nope. Toffler was a renowned writer who accurately described many forces that would reshape the world. But along with his many good predictions, there were many bad ones. And what only a few years ago looked like another one of his duds — that remote work would kill the office and lead to urban decline — may now seem prophetic.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Sir Clive Sinclair has died. The British inventor helped revolutionize the computer industry.

WILL GUYATT: Well, you had everything going on in Palo Alto. And you had Wozniak and Jobs. We had our very own guy, and this was Sir Clive Sinclair.

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LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Kate Bilowitz of Oakland, Calif., works full-time and is a mother. She has a hobby of sorts during these often-contentious times that's made her a source of information.

A self-taught electrical engineer transformed the video game world in the 1970s.

Before Gerald "Jerry" Lawson helped invent the first video game console with interchangeable game cartridges, players were limited to a preset selection of games built into systems.

As such, Lawson has been called the "father of modern gaming." But to Karen and Anderson Lawson, he was first and foremost "Dad."

Jerry died in 2011 at age 70. At StoryCorps, Anderson, now 49, and Karen, 52, remembered how their father's pioneering spirit also influenced how he raised them.

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NOEL KING, HOST:

Today might be the day that determines the future of COVID-19 booster shots in this country.

A MARTINEZ, HOST:

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NOEL KING, HOST:

The United Nations' human rights chief has called on member states to put a moratorium on the sale and use of artificial intelligence systems until the "negative, even catastrophic" risks they pose can be addressed.

The remarks by U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet were in reference to a new report on the subject released in Geneva.

Microsoft is about to make it easier for those of us who struggle to keep track of our passwords or remember which one we used for each account.

Starting this week, the tech giant is rolling out passwordless sign-in for consumers, so you no longer have to enter a password to gain access to your Microsoft accounts.

The most nimble game developers borrow. Like Shakespeare himself, they rummage through venerated titles crafted by the old guard and snag anything useful to them.

Lawmakers on Capitol Hill are pressing Facebook to abandon its plans to build a version of its Instagram app for kids and demanding the company share research into how Instagram affects teenage users.

The Justice Department has accused an upstate New York health insurance plan for seniors, along with a medical analytics company the insurer is affiliated with, of cheating the government out of tens of millions of dollars.

The civil complaint of fraud, filed this week, is the first by the federal government to target a data mining company for allegedly helping a Medicare Advantage program to game federal billing regulations in a way that enables the plan to overcharge for patient treatment.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

During the first day of jury selection at the federal fraud trial of Elizabeth Holmes, an incognito San Diego hotel magnate pulled a large Rice Krispie Treat from his pocket.

Loudly. So loudly, in fact, that the judge's voice was barely audible in the back of the courtroom over the sound of his wiggling the brick-shaped snack out of tightly-wrapped plastic.

"My name's Hanson," said the man, wearing a baseball cap and a Patagonia puffer jacket.

A federal judge on Friday issued a long-awaited ruling in Fortnite maker Epic Games' legal battle with Apple over its App Store policies.

Both sides are using the 185-page ruling to double down on their own positions, which is possible because the details are complicated.

If anything, though, Apple and Google did land small wins, but neither got what it wanted.

Updated September 11, 2021 at 12:07 PM ET

Six U.S. senators are calling for a federal probe into Amazon's treatment of pregnant employees at its warehouses. It's the latest push by lawmakers across the country to focus regulatory attention on the working conditions for the company's ballooning workforce.

Updated September 10, 2021 at 1:18 PM ET

A federal judge ordered Apple on Friday to crack open the tightly controlled App Store and allow people to use payment methods other than Apple's own processor, which usually collects a 30% commission on app purchases.

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AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Updated September 9, 2021 at 4:44 PM ET

Amazon is under pressure from Democrats in Congress over how its algorithms promote hoax COVID-19 cures, including the livestock dewormer ivermectin, as well as anti-vaccination claims and other medical misinformation.

"I shouldn't have waited."

In the final video posted on her TikTok account, Megan Alexandra Blankenbiller pleaded with her followers not to make the same mistake she did — waiting to get the COVID-19 vaccine — that eventually cost her her life.

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NOEL KING, HOST:

Jurors in the fraud trial of Elizabeth Holmes heard vastly different portrayals on Wednesday of the onetime whiz kid who amazed Silicon Valley with promises of biotech breakthroughs at her company, Theranos.

In a stinging opening statement on Wednesday, federal prosecutors described Holmes as a manipulative fraudster who duped investors and patients alike and knew the whole time that she was hoodwinking them.

Howard University in Washington, D.C., partially reopened Wednesday after a ransomware cyberattack forced the university to cancel Tuesday's classes.

In-person classes are resuming, while online and hybrid undergraduate courses remain suspended, according to a statement from the university.

El Salvador has become the first country in the world to make the cryptocurrency Bitcoin legal tender.

Advocates of the digital currency, including the country's president, Nayib Bukele, say the policy that took effect Tuesday morning was historic.

But the first few hours of Bitcoin's official status in El Salvador were marred by technological hiccups as the country opened its digital wallet app to residents and consumers for the first time.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

El Salvador this week officially became the first country in the world to adopt Bitcoin as legal tender. Tim Padgett of member station WLRN in Miami reports.

GoDaddy will no longer host a site set up by the Texas Right to Life to collect anonymous tips about when the state's new law banning almost all abortions was being violated.

The website promoted itself as a way to "help enforce the Texas Heartbeat Act," since the Texas law allows private citizens to sue anyone who performs or assists in an abortion after six weeks of pregnancy, before many women even know they are pregnant.

Ride-hailing apps Lyft and Uber said they will cover all the legal fees of any of their drivers who are sued under Texas's restrictive new abortion law.

Activists on TikTok are fighting back against Texas' new restrictive abortion law with spam.

Sean Black, who goes by @black_madness21 on TikTok, created a bot that makes it easy to submit fake tips to a "whistleblower" website created by the anti-abortion Texas Right to Life group.

Eight states will begin to roll out a new feature that will allow users to add their driver's license and state IDs to Apple Wallet for iPhone and Apple Watch.

Arizona and Georgia will be the first states to introduce the feature, Apple announced on Wednesday, with Connecticut, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Oklahoma and Utah to follow afterward.

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