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Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Unintended Consequences.

About Edward Tenner's TED Talk

Edward Tenner says we shouldn't fear technology's unintended consequences. He argues for taking the long view of history, and that human ingenuity often finds solutions to negative consequences.

About Edward Tenner

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Unintended Consequences.

About Kashmir Hill's TED Talk

When Kashmir Hill filled her home with smart devices, she knew they would collect massive amounts of her personal information. She wanted to understand: what's the ultimate cost of that data mining?

About Kashmir Hill

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Unintended Consequences.

About Yasmin Green's TED Talk

Extremist groups have co-opted the Internet's connective power to recruit members. Yasmin Green explores how the Internet has allowed extremism to spread, and how technology can combat it.

About Yasmin Green

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Unintended Consequences.

About Yuval Noah Harari's TED Talk

Yuval Noah Harari says data is the new source of political power, and he worries that big data and AI technology threaten to destroy liberal democracy.

About Yuval Noah Harari

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Unintended Consequences.

About James Bridle's TED Talk

Children's YouTube is full of addicting content for kids, which can lead users to disturbing and inappropriate videos. James Bridle explains how the Internet's profit structure drives this phenomenon.

About James Bridle

Mario Segale, who inspired the plucky plumber Mario — one of the most recognizable characters in the world, let alone in video games — has died at age 84. Segale was Nintendo's landlord outside Seattle when the company created Donkey Kong, the classic game that launched the overalls-wearing Mario.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Thousands of Google employees around the world hit the streets today to show that they are fed up with the way the company handles sexual harassment complaints and to demand changes in workplace culture.

Updated at 2:40 p.m. ET

Google employees worldwide are walking off the job to protest the company's treatment of women and its handling of sexual assault cases.

They walked out of Google offices at 11:10 a.m. local time Thursday in Singapore, Zurich, London, Dublin and New York City, filling nearby streets, sidewalks and parks.

And in California, home to Google's headquarters, employees streamed out of its offices into plazas.

Hawaii's Supreme Court has sided with scientists in a battle to build one of the world's largest telescopes, rejecting efforts by native Hawaiians to block its construction atop what some consider a sacred volcano.

In 2015, a construction permit for the Thirty Meter Telescope, or TMT, to be built on Mauna Kea, was invalidated amid protests and court appeals, claiming the dormant volcano is sacred land that would be violated in the building process.

A treatment for early stage cervical cancer that has rapidly gained acceptance in the United States turns out to be worse than standard surgery, according to two studies.

The practice, now thrown into question, is called minimally invasive surgery. Instruments are threaded through small incisions, and surgeons use those to remove a diseased uterus. This technique has been growing in popularity since 2006 and has been widely adopted.

Nearly 30 Percent Of Anti-Semitic Online Attacks Are Bots

Oct 31, 2018

Anti-Semitism and hate crimes have surged in the U.S. over the past couple of years, and almost 30 percent of accounts repeatedly tweeting against Jews on Twitter appear to be bots, according to a recently released study from the Anti-Defamation League.

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The popular apps Tinder and Bumble have upended dating culture, all with a swipe.

But Tinder's parent company says the similarities between the apps suggest another kind of swiping — of ideas.

In dueling lawsuits, Match, which owns Tinder, alleges that Bumble stole Tinder's intellectual property. Bumble says those claims are bogus, designed to drive down Bumble's worth and "poison Bumble in the investment market," according to Bumble's lawsuit.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

In what may be the most significant tech acquisition of the year, IBM says it will acquire open-source software company Red Hat for approximately $34 billion.

Under the terms of the deal announced Sunday, IBM will acquire Red Hat for $190 a share — a premium of more than 60 percent over Red Hat's closing price of $116.68 on Friday.

Updated at 6:50 a.m. ET Monday

The alternative social media network that was reportedly used by the suspect in the deadly shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue is now down.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

In the not-too-distant future, fully autonomous vehicles will drive our streets. These cars will need to make split-second decisions to avoid endangering human lives — both inside and outside of the vehicles.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Blockchain And Climate Change

Oct 25, 2018

Copyright 2018 KQED. To see more, visit KQED.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In the U.S., girls and boys are both big smartphone users.

That's not necessarily the case in the developing world, says a new report released this month by the nonprofit organization Girl Effect.

The "Real Girls, Real Lives, Connected" report surveyed more than 3,000 teenage girls and boys in 25 countries, with a focus on developing nations, including Nigeria, Bangladesh, India and Rwanda, through online questionnaires and in-person interviews.

It's a chilly autumn afternoon but inside a little Brooklyn bakery, it's hot. School just let out, and the store is filled with kids eyeing baked goodies. Their banter mixes with Caribbean music playing in the background.

La Gran Via Bakery is an institution in this neighborhood. It's been around since 1978 — three generations of pastry chefs making cakes, cupcakes and traditional Latin American pastries.

The Justice Department has revealed more than ever about the inner workings of Russia's disinformation war against the United States and the West — including how it continues to this day.

A criminal complaint unsealed Friday in the Eastern District of Virginia served both to level charges at a woman accused of serving as the money boss for the operation and to document, in ample detail, how it works.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

With midterm elections just two weeks away, Facebook says it is ramping up its operations to fight disinformation.

The social media behemoth has established a "war room" at its headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif., where specialists try to detect and disrupt bad actors attempting to delegitimize elections, spread fake information and suppress the vote.

Technology continues to get closer and closer to our bodies, from the phones in our pockets to the smartwatches on our wrists. Now, for some people, it's getting under their skin.

In Sweden, a country rich with technological advancement, thousands have had microchips inserted into their hands.

The chips are designed to speed up users' daily routines and make their lives more convenient — accessing their homes, offices and gyms is as easy as swiping their hands against digital readers.

Last winter, when Chung Soo-young saw a man rushing out of the women's restroom at a chain coffee shop in downtown Seoul, the first thing she did was to scan all stalls in search of a hidden camera. Like many other South Korean women, Chung, 26, constantly worries that she could be secretly filmed in private moments. Her fear spiked, she says, when she saw the intruder and "realized I can actually be a victim."

Updated at 5:24 p.m. ET

The U.S. government warned about the continued threat of foreign interference on Friday as it unsealed a new criminal complaint against a Russian woman described as the paymistress for Moscow's program of information war — a scheme targeting next month's midterm elections in the U.S.

To explain why folks in rural Delta County, Colo. are feeling a lot less anxious than they were a couple years ago, consider the story of Johnny Olivas.

He's digging a line down a steep, dirt driveway, where he'll lay fiber optic cable into a home. His company, Lightworks Fiber, has begun installing badly needed broadband to this remote valley of deserts and aspen-cloaked mesas.

"I didn't know anything about fiber optic, but you catch on pretty quick," Olivas says during a break. "It's a hell of a lot easier than coal mining."

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