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And we have to make a transition now. It's time for sports.

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A few months after Jackie Robinson broke modern baseball's color barrier in 1947, Larry Doby became the first Black player in baseball's American League. A year later, Satchel Paige joined the Cleveland Indians as the team's second Black player.

The two Black players, and the team owner's willingness to sign them, propelled Cleveland to win the World Series in 1948 in one of baseball's most notable seasons.

It's the story told in Luke Epplin's new book, Our Team: The Epic Story of Four Men and the World Series That Changed Baseball.

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Athletes holding the Olympic torch set off on a relay run Thursday morning in Japan's northeast, showing the organizers' determination to proceed with the Summer Games, despite widespread public skepticism.

The relay is set to crisscross across Japan and arrive at the opening ceremony in Tokyo on July 23.

When the South Dakota state legislature passed HB 1217 in early March, South Dakota Republican Gov. Kristi Noem tweeted that she was "excited" to sign it.

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Under fire for differences in amenities for its men's and women's basketball tournaments, the NCAA revealed an upgraded weight room Saturday for players participating in the women's college basketball tournament in San Antonio.

What had been a single small rack of dumbbells has now been replaced with a larger space with more equipment, including a variety of bars, racks and stands.

The facilities were upgraded overnight after the organization was widely criticized by players, coaches and fans alike.

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This year's Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games will take place without any overseas spectators after organizers decided to ban international fans from attending the events over COVID-19 concerns.

The decision was made during a virtual meeting between the various stakeholders on Saturday.

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It's a tough week, but now it's time for sports.

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On Thursday, Stanford University sports performance coach Ali Kershner posted a photo comparing the weight room set-up for the NCAA women's and men's basketball tournaments.

While the set-up for the men's teams included a number of power racks with Olympic bars and weights, the women were provided with a set of dumbbells and yoga mats for the three weeks they will be in the tournament bubble.

The post created another sort of March Madness.

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The pandemic-bubble versions of the NCAA basketball tournament kick off this week. Men's teams are in Indianapolis, while women's teams are in San Antonio.

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The NFL has finalized a new round of broadcast rights agreements, providing the league with a financial windfall and fans with more options to watch the games.

Amazon, CBS, ESPN/ABC, Fox and NBC, which all currently broadcast NFL games, have signed deals with the league through 2033. The new agreements, which were announced on Thursday and will commence with the start of the 2023 season, include television and expanded streaming rights.

For college basketball fans, March Madness is back and a historic wait is over. Last year, for the first time ever, the wildly popular men's and women's Division 1 basketball tournaments were canceled because of the pandemic. Play starts today in the main draw of the men's tournament; the women start Sunday.

A year's worth of pent up excitement is about to burst, although still muted somewhat by the coronavirus.

Here to help guide, an A – Z of March Madness.

Throughout the country, roughly 35 bills have been introduced by state legislators that would limit or prohibit transgender women from competing in women's athletics, according to the LGBTQ rights group Freedom for All Americans. That's up from only two in 2019.

As the NCAA men's basketball tournament tips off in Indiana, some of the players want to remind everyone of the control that the NCAA exerts over their lives — including their names, images and likenesses.

Under the hashtag #NotNCAAProperty, a protest was launched Wednesday by Rutgers basketball player Geo Baker, Iowa basketball player Jordan Bohannon and Michigan basketball player Isaiah Livers, all upperclassmen on Big Ten teams.

The official in charge of ceremonies for the long-delayed Tokyo Olympics has stepped down following a report that he made disparaging remarks about a Japanese female entertainer.

March Madness Gears Up

Mar 17, 2021

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The head coach for the top-ranked team in women's college basketball has tested positive for the coronavirus. Geno Auriemma of the University of Connecticut confirmed the diagnosis just days before the NCAA championship tournament is set to begin. UConn is a number one seed.

Auriemma is isolating at home. "I feel great – I don't have any symptoms so it came as a complete shock to me and my medical staff. We've been testing every day," Auriemma told reporters Monday evening via teleconference.

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It is the end of an era in New Orleans. Saints quarterback Drew Brees is retiring after 15 years with the team.

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Yeah, his kids broke the news on Instagram. Brees is transitioning over to be a game analyst.

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The boxing world is mourning the sudden death of one of the sport's greatest fighters. Marvelous Marvin Hagler died Saturday in New Hampshire. He was 66. Hagler helped popularize the sport in the 1980s. Here's NPR's Tom Goldman.

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