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Sports

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Being an elite athlete takes discipline, talent and hard work. But according to a new book, there are also a bunch of invisible factors that help create champions. Planet Money's Greg Rosalsky has the story.

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Cries of "cowabunga" will soon ring out in the sprawling desert east of Los Angeles. Sun, sand, and surfing are hallmarks of Southern California's famous beaches. But, in the not-too-distant future, people who live a lot farther inland will be able to ride the waves.

It's late fall in the desert oasis of Palm Springs. That means a slight breeze and afternoon sun comfortably warming temperatures to the low 80s. While some enjoy the nice weather playing golf or sunbathing, a dedicated crew is hard at work transforming the defunct Wet 'n' Wild water park near the city's airport.

Protests for racial justice and the pandemic changed the face of sports in 2020. Many changes will survive into 2021.

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And now it's time for sports.

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Updated 3:32 p.m. ET

The start of the NBA 2020-2021 season is already off to a bumpy start with the postponement of the Houston Rockets vs. Oklahoma City Thunder matchup Wednesday because of coronavirus issues.

It was just Day 2 of competition for the fledgling NBA season.

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Three skiers died in two avalanches that struck Colorado mountains in recent days, in snow that avalanche experts warn is the most unstable it has been in years.

On Friday, a skier was buried by an avalanche on the northeast end of the Anthracite Range, west of Crested Butte. Two other skiers located the buried skier with a transceiver and pulled him out, but he did not survive.

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All right. So here's a headline that you have heard many times over the years - a golfer by the name of Woods stunning spectators. That was the case again this weekend.

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I finally get to say, it's time for sports.

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SIMON: One hundred years after the Negro Leagues were founded, those superb ballplayers finally get major league status. But is that an empty honor?

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Updated at 1 p.m. ET

Russia has been banned from fielding a national team in the next two Olympics and any world championship sporting event for the next two years, a decision that reduces the length of Russia's suspension issued by the World Anti-Doping Agency last year. Individual Russian athletes who compete will not be allowed to use their nation's flag and anthem.

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Major League Baseball has finally accepted players from the Negro Leagues as major leaguers. MLB says this decision comes 100 years after the start of the Negro Leagues. NPR's Tom Goldman reports.

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Major League Baseball has for years acknowledged the contributions and the legacy of the thousands of Black athletes who played in the Negro Leagues.

On Wednesday, the league went a step further, saying it was officially "correcting a longtime oversight in the game's history" and recognizing those professionals as Major League-caliber players. The league said it will also include their statistics and records as part of MLB history.

John Thompson, Georgetown University's Hall of Fame former basketball coach, died in August.

I got the call most reporters (be honest, reporters) hate: "Can you give us a few minutes on his life? In about three hours?"

When you have the time, obituaries can be wonderful stories to write. New York Times obits are legendary for their beautiful prose and storytelling. But a few minutes on air? To capture a man's life? His highs, his lows, the good, the bad?

The Backcountry Boom

Dec 15, 2020

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Last weekend, Tara VanDerveer made history. The Stanford head coach tied the record for the most wins in Division I women's basketball.

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If you have ever traveled across time zones, you know jet lag is real and not just something that affects sleepy business travelers.

With nation's confirmed coronavirus infections surging, the NCAA announced Monday it plans to stage the entire Division I women's basketball tournament in one geographic area when it tips off in March.

Talks are already underway with officials in San Antonio to host the 64 teams that will compete in the single-elimination tournament.

NCAA officials said it aims to limit the spread of the virus by cutting down on the amount of travel required by teams.

Cleveland's Major League Baseball team is the latest professional sports franchise to announce it will abandon its longtime name, which is widely seen as racist or culturally offensive.

The baseball club, known since 1915 as the Cleveland Indians, announced in a statement Monday that it will "begin the process of changing the name," according to a letter to fans from owner Paul Dolan.

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And, no matter the news, it's time for sports.

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