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Updated April 7, 2021 at 2:51 PM ET

Tiger Woods crashed in February because he was driving at an unsafe speed and was unable to negotiate a curve on the road, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said Wednesday.

The legendary golfer sustained a compound fracture to one leg in addition to other injuries in the single-vehicle crash Feb. 23 in the Los Angeles area.

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Texas Western's Streak Is Over

Apr 6, 2021

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It has been a long time since a men's team from the state of Texas has won a college basketball championship - 1966, to be exact. That changed last night.

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Major League Baseball's 2021 All-Star Game will be played in Colorado's Coors Field, the league says, after it canceled plans for Atlanta to host baseball's midseason centerpiece. The change came in response to Georgia's controversial new voting law, which the MLB says is against its values.

"Major League Baseball is grateful to the Rockies, the City of Denver and the State of Colorado for their support of this summer's All-Star Game," Baseball Commissioner Robert Manfred Jr. said.

North Korea says it will skip the upcoming Summer Olympics in Tokyo, citing coronavirus concerns – a move that frustrates South Korea's hopes that the games might revive stalled peace talks between the bitter rivals.

The decision to sit out the already delayed Tokyo Games means the North's athletes will be a no-show at the Olympics for the first time since Pyongyang boycotted them in 1988, the year they were held in Seoul.

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Updated April 6, 2021 at 10:58 AM ET

The Baylor Bears are celebrating their first championship season after beating the previously undefeated Gonzaga Bulldogs 86-70 on Monday night at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis.

Baylor dominated the high-stakes game, which turned out to be relatively low drama.

"The hoped-for titanic clash didn't deliver the 'titanic' part," NPR's Tom Goldman told Morning Edition.

Basketball fans love two types of March Madness matchups.

David vs Goliath. The classic little school against big school with the hope that little prevails.

And then there's power vs power. While we may lose the shock of an underdog win, we gain the potential awesomeness of two complete, deep basketball teams going at each other and seeing who's left standing.

In other words, Gonzaga vs Baylor 2021.

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Updated April 4, 2021 at 10:40 PM ET

Stanford defeated Arizona Sunday night 54-53 in the women's NCAA finals, securing their third-ever championship title. The Cardinal's victory in San Antonio gives the Pac-12 its first national women's championship since Stanford last won in 1992.

The matchup, played in front of a limited in-person audience, was the first time two teams from the Pac-12 faced off for a national title in the NCAA women's tournament.

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And now it's time for sports.

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This summer's Major League Baseball Draft and the All-Star Game won't be held in Atlanta, MLB officials announced Friday.

The withdrawal of the two events from the city in July is in response to Georgia's recently enacted voting restrictions, which critics, including President Biden, have denounced as "Jim Crow in the 21st century" because they say the legislation will disproportionately affect communities of color.

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Roy Williams says it's time to say goodbye. The legendary college men's basketball coach is retiring. Here's North Carolina Public Radio's Dave DeWitt.

After 33 seasons as a head coach in men's college basketball, Roy Williams is hanging up his whistle and calling it quits. The head coach at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill announced his retirement Thursday morning.

The 2007 Naismith Hall of Fame inductee led the UNC Tar Heels to three national championships, winning titles in 2005, 2009 and 2017. Williams also guided UNC to two other Final Fours, nine ACC regular season titles and three ACC tournament championships.

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Hot dogs. Peanuts. Cold Beer. Food – especially the unhealthy kind – has long been an indelible part of the baseball fan experience.

And as a new baseball season kicks off, all those ballpark staples will still be available. How that food gets to you, however, will be a different matter.

With the Major League Baseball season starting off with much reduced capacity at most ballparks and with social distancing rules, teams have had to think hard about how to interact with their fans.

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It's opening day, the start of a new baseball season, but when fans get to the ballpark, it will look and feel very different this year. Here's NPR's H.J. Mai.

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As March Madness heads into its final days, college athletes are playing on a different kind of court: the Supreme Court. On Wednesday the justices heard arguments in a case testing whether the NCAA's limits on compensation for student athletes violate the nation's antitrust laws.

The players contend that the NCAA is operating a system that is a classic restraint of competition in violation of the federal laws barring price fixing in markets, including the labor market.

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As March Madness plays out on TV, the U.S. Supreme Court takes a rare excursion into sports law Wednesday in a case testing whether the NCAA's limits on compensation for student athletes violate the nation's antitrust laws.

The outcome could have enormous consequences for college athletics.

National Football League owners voted Tuesday to approve an enhanced schedule that will bring the number of regular-season games to 17 per team starting this year. The long-discussed change is expected to bring additional revenue to the NFL, which finalized a new round of broadcast rights agreements earlier this month.

After failed negotiations between South Dakota Republican Gov. Kristi Noem and the state's House lawmakers, the governor issued two executive orders Monday designed to limit participation on women's and girls' school sports teams to people assigned female at birth.

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Today, two No. 1 seeds in action in the NCAA playoffs and four NBA games. Tomorrow, the first two matches of college's Elite Eight and 11 more NBA games. Are you going to watch it all or just the highlights?

Tennessee Governor Bill Lee has signed into law a controversial bill requiring students to prove their sex at birth in order to participate in middle and high school sports.

The bill, which Lee signed on Friday, makes Tennessee the third state this month to adopt legislation aimed at restricting transgender girls from playing female sports. Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson signed a similar bill on Thursday, as did Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves earlier this month. All three governors are Republicans.

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