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With tears, songs and prayers, a multitude of Argentines flooded into the heart of Buenos Aires to pay their final respects to Diego Maradona, one of the world's greatest soccer players.

Thousands of fans lined up from the early hours on Thursday to file past Maradona's wooden casket as he lay in the Casa Rosada, the presidential palace, beneath his nation's sky-blue-and-white flag and his signature No. 10 shirt.

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How many more people might President Trump pardon before he leaves office January 20?

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I first came to know Diego Armando Maradona in September 1993, when I was watching the qualifying match between Argentina and my country of Colombia for the 1994 FIFA World Cup.

Even though I was just a young kid at the time, I knew that Maradona, Argentina's star player, was something special. His vision, the way he dribbled past his opponents — he was respected and adored not just in his country, but across Latin America and the world.

NFL fans who plan to watch football after Thanksgiving dinner will have to make new plans this year.

That's because the NFL has postponed Thursday night's Baltimore Ravens and Pittsburgh Steelers game to Sunday, the league announced Wednesday. Two other NFL games will take place earlier in the day on Thursday.

Updated 1:45 p.m. ET

Diego Armando Maradona, who rose from the slums of Buenos Aires to lead Argentina's national team to victory in the 1986 World Cup, lost his way through substance abuse and then pursued a second career as a coach, died Wednesday at the age of 60, according to media reports.

He reportedly suffered a heart attack at his home in a suburb of Buenos Aires.

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Updated at 12:27 a.m. ET Tuesday

The Monday Night Football matchup between the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Los Angeles Rams made history, but it had nothing to do with the two teams vying for playoff seeding.

For the first time, the league assembled an all-Black officiating crew, led by Jerome Boger, a 17-year NFL official.

Rounding out the seven-member crew: umpire Barry Anderson, side judge Anthony Jeffries, line judge Carl Johnson, down judge Julian Mapp, field judge Dale Shaw and back judge Greg Steed.

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There's been a significant suspension for doping in Major League Baseball.

MLB announced Wednesday that New York Mets second baseman Robinson Canó will miss all of next season, without pay, after he tested positive for an anabolic steroid banned by baseball.

Canó's ban is 162 games, the length of a normal MLB regular season. He also has to forfeit his $24 million salary for 2021.

The coronavirus pandemic is forcing the NCAA to scrap its traditional multi-city Division I Men's basketball tournament format in 2021. Instead, the NCAA plans to host all of March Madness in a single area in the spring, officials announced Monday.

The NCAA said it is holding talks with officials from the state of Indiana and the city of Indianapolis to host the 68-team tournament in March and early April.

Professional and college sports are playing through the pandemic, although it's taken a toll.

Dustin Johnson won his first Masters title on Sunday at Augusta National, and added the famous green jacket to his wardrobe just a year after he finished tied for second in a career best at the 2019 tournament.

He finished the final round of his 10th Masters appearance with a record 20 under par and won the tournament five strokes over Australia's Cameron Smith and South Korea's Sungjae Im, who tied for second place.

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The Miami Marlins announced Friday that Kim Ng would be joining their ranks as the team's general manager, the first woman to hold the position in Major League Baseball. Ng began her baseball career in 1990 as an intern with the Chicago White Sox, but that was just the beginning.

In many ways, Megan Rapinoe seems like the perfect athlete-memoirist for the moment. The star of the United States Women's National Soccer team was catapulted into the national spotlight during the team's 2019 World Cup Championship — both for her on-field play and her off-field political views.

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All right. One of golf's most famous tournaments begins today, the 84th masters in Augusta, Ga.

WRIGHT THOMPSON: For golfers, I mean, it's Carnegie Hall. Getting there is difficult. Forget doing well there or winning.

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Emily Harrington climbed her way into the history books last week, becoming the first woman to free-climb the Golden Gate route of Yosemite National Park's El Capitan in less than one day.

Harrington, 34, topped the 3,000-foot mountain last Wednesday in 21 hours, 13 minutes and 51 seconds, making her the fourth woman to free-climb the monolith featured in the Oscar-winning documentary Free Solo.

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In the 2019 Women's World Cup finals, when the final whistle blew and the U.S. team stormed the field in celebration, thousands of fans chanted, "Equal pay! Equal Pay!"

The U.S. Women's National Team, co-captained by Megan Rapinoe, has been a symbol of gender equality ever since they filed a lawsuit in March 2019 against the U.S. Soccer Federation alleging pay discrimination.

It's the championship of the Afghan women's soccer league in the capital, and the Herat Storm is facing off against the Kabul Fortress. This is a conservative country, and the players sprint across the field in long-sleeved shirts, and leggings under their baggy shorts. Black hoodie-style hijabs cover their hair.

Men and boys clump in one bunch of seats; women and girls in another, but they're feisty: hollering, hooting and banging on drums as the players kick goals.

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A'ja Wilson, a forward for the Las Vegas Aces, is the 2020 WNBA Most Valuable Player, so we've invited her to play a game called "Please take a number and stand in line." Three questions for a basketball MVP about the DMV.

Click the audio link above to find out how she does.

Updated 7:00 a.m. ET Saturday

The Boston Red Sox have brought back one-time manager Alex Cora. Less than 10 months ago, the team parted ways with him for his role in the Houston Astros sign-stealing cheating scandal during the 2017 and 2018 seasons.

The National Basketball Players Association has approved a plan to start the upcoming NBA season next month but said other details still need to be sorted out before the union and league can finalize the 2020-21 season.

Under this plan, the season would tip off on Dec. 22 and will include a 72-game schedule, the NBPA said in a statement.

Sports monolith ESPN informed employees that pandemic-related layoffs are coming Thursday morning. In a company memo obtained by NPR, Jimmy Pitaro, chairman, ESPN and sports content, revealed that 300 people will be laid off. Additionally, 200 open positions will be eliminated, totaling a 10% workforce reduction worldwide.

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