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Rose Byrne-ing Down The House

Aug 31, 2018

Rose Byrne has her older sister to thank for launching her acting career. When Byrne was eight years old, her sister told their parents that Rose ought to study acting. "I was very shy," she told NPR's Ask Me Another host Ophira Eisenberg at the Bell House in Brooklyn, New York. "I think they thought it would help me come out of my shell, perhaps." Byrne, who grew up in Balmain, a suburb of Sydney, joined the Australian Theatre for Young People and discovered her love of acting.

The book Small Fry is a memoir of a girl growing up in 1980s California as the daughter of a single mom — an artist who is frequently moving from place to place, never able to make ends meet. The author insists it's universal, a coming-of-age story amid the scent of eucalyptus and West Coast sunlight.

Except the writer's father is Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple.

'Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan' Gets An 'A' For Adequacy

Aug 31, 2018

"I mean, I guess, if you want."

This is the review I threatened to write on Twitter the other day for a show I didn't name that is, in fact, Jack Ryan. Officially, Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan. More specifically, Amazon's Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan. And, per some new corporate branding, Amazon's Prime Video's Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan.

Paul Taylor, one of the most prolific and influential choreographers in the world of modern dance, died Wednesday, Aug. 29. The cause was renal failure, the Paul Taylor Dance Foundation confirmed. He was 88.

The movements Taylor created on stage were inspired by everyday people doing everyday things, including doing nothing at all. It was an approach that at first turned people away — but he eventually turned them around.

"I've had enough of whiny French films," says Mathias, the resident cinema studies provocateur, in Jean-Paul Civeyrac's A Paris Education, essentially taping a "KICK ME" sign to the back of a film about the grievances of the young and self-involved. Because A Paris Education takes place in and around a film school, such proclamations about what films should and shouldn't be inevitably color how Civeyrac's own art will be perceived. Will it be present and true, engaging with real life with the unvarnished honesty that Mathias demands?

For a drama about the capture of one of the most notorious architects of the Holocaust, Chris Weitz's Operation Finale begins with a bit of a caper. A crack team of Mossad agents, on a tip from a young Jewish woman (Haley Lu Richardson), bungle the job by bringing down the wrong Nazi. Shrugging off their error, the unit, headed by Peter Malkin (Oscar Isaac) forges ahead to snag the real Adolf Eichmann as he's walking home through a leafy Buenos Aires suburb. Needless to say, he's played by Ben Kingsley; so also needless to say, he is seriously unflapped.

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Crayons, of course. Scented markers. Colored pencils, presharpened. And coloring books by the jillions.

Why do people like coloring so much? For grown-ups, I can totally get the nostalgia — and the simple pleasure of creating something.

But here at NPR Ed, we're all about kids and learning. And so, as parents head to the store this summer with their back-to-school lists, we thought this question was worth a serious look:

Voices Of Empty Nesters

Aug 30, 2018

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The new podcast from Radiotopia, Everything is Alive, features one long-format interview in each episode. What sets this podcast apart is the guests.

(SOUNDBITE OF RADIO SHOW, "EVERYTHING IS ALIVE")

Born into a decaying world, today's youth are only just beginning to grasp the extent to which their elders have neglected and sabotaged their futures. But the great irony of environmental science is that new, exciting advancements continue to be made even as the planet's hopes for long-term recovery slip further and further from our grasp.

The Detroit Free Press issued a stern directive to fans and would-be Instagram influencers gathering this week to commemorate Aretha Franklin in her hometown. "Remember," admonished staffer (and occasional NPR contributor) Rochelle Riley in her Tuesday column, "We will treat this like church." No selfies are allowed with Franklin's gold-plated coffin, as she lay in repose at the Charles H.

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The word "nice" is a persistent problem for journalists Michael D'Antonio and Peter Eisner in their new, hostile biography of Mike Pence, The Shadow President: The Truth About Mike Pence.

The truth about Pence, according to them, is that he is a sinister zealot, an opportunist, and a "Christian supremacist" biding his time until he can take over the presidency from Donald Trump.

But here's the problem: Sources keep calling Pence things like "nice." Luckily, D'Antonio and Eisner have a strategy — they just pretend that "nice" means its opposite.

Patrick deWitt's novels don't so much skewer genres as turn them askew. His latest is the third of a trilogy of literary hijinks that began with The Sisters Brothers (2011), a gleefully gruesome, wonky western set during the Gold Rush. This was followed by Undermajordomo Minor (2015), a sort of fairytale adventure for adults. French Exit, aptly billed as a "tragedy of manners," is a mother-son caper, a sparkling dark comedy that channels both Noel Coward's wit and Wes Anderson's loopy sensibility.

Every reader has her own idea of a beach book. Some want crime, or romance. Some want summer best-sellers, some want Moby-Dick. My definition of a beach read is simple. First, I want a beach book to be long, twisty, and ambitious. I want it to have a complete world. Second, I want it to have a strong voice. If I'm going to read surrounded by people, then the characters I'm reading about better be loud.

Writer Anand Giridharadas has a dark view of American philanthropy.

He has been writing about people who say they're changing the world for the better — except that despite their best efforts, it's not working.

It was an undercover operation set in Argentina, 1960. An elite crew of Israeli agents tracked down and secretly kidnapped one of the world's most notorious war criminals: the Nazi SS officer Adolf Eichmann, who was hiding in Buenos Aires.

Eichmann was among the major organizers of the Holocaust, responsible for transporting millions of European Jews to death camps. The film Operation Finale, starring Ben Kingsley, recounts the daring mission to bring Eichmann to justice.

Hundreds lined up Tuesday outside Detroit's Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, where Aretha Franklin's body is lying in repose for two days ahead of her funeral on Friday.

"This is history right here," said 22-year-old Sidney Lloyd of Detroit. His family arrived by 7 a.m. Tuesday to be among the first to say goodbye to the Queen of Soul.

Did Louis C.K. Return To Comedy Too Soon?

Aug 28, 2018

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Just after the news about Louis C.K.'s return broke, the comedian and actress Melinda Hill tweeted, Louis C.K. is spearheading the #MeTooSoon movement. Melinda Hill is with us now to talk about all of this. Welcome.

MELINDA HILL: Thank you so much for having me.

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Ohio, the debut novel from author Stephen Markley, begins with a parade, but it's not a happy one. The town of New Canaan has gathered to salute Rick Brinklan, a native of the city who was killed in action in Iraq. The novel then jumps in time to 2013, six years after that parade: "It's hard to say where any of this ends or how it ever began, because what you eventually learn is that there is no such thing as linear," Markley writes. "There is only this wild ... flamethrower of a collective dream in which we were all born and traveled and died."

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