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Overwhelmed With COVID Patients, Oregon Hospitals Postpone Surgeries And Cancer Care

It's a bad time to get sick in Oregon. That's what many doctors are telling their patients and the public, as hospitals full of COVID-19 patients have been forced to postpone some treatments of other medical conditions. Charlie Callagan had his scheduled bone-marrow transplant postponed. Now he's waiting for a new surgery date, hunkered down at his home in Merlin, a small Rogue Valley town in southern Oregon. Though he looks perfectly healthy, sitting in the smoky summer air on his outdoor...

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Las Cruces – A replica of the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington, D.C. is travelling the country. It was spreading its message in July here in Las Cruces.

Las Cruces, NM – West Nile virus continues to spread in southern New Mexico.

Las Cruces, NM – A Las Cruces School Spokeswoman feels that higher standards may be to blame for low ratings.

Images Archives for January, 2003. You'll need Real Player to listen

Las Cruces, NM – Images is a locally produced program with Carrie Hamblen, which looks at the arts, the flavor, the people, and the uniqueness of Southern New Mexico and West Texas. Images began as a bi-monthly program on October 26th, 1997 with the goal of sharing with KRWG listeners insights into the people and events of our state.

Images archive for February 2003

Images is a locally produced program with Carrie Hamblen, which looks at the arts, the flavor, the people, and the uniqueness of Southern New Mexico and West Texas. Images began as a bi-monthly program on October 26th, 1997 with the goal of sharing with KRWG listeners insights into the people and events of our state.

Las Cruces, NM – Deming's sheriff says a crackdown on graffiti is diminishing gang problems.

Las Cruces, NM – US and Mexican border states work to improve environmental conditions. The plan is called Border 2012.

Join Carrie Hamblen as she talks with Iraq Peace team member Mary Burton Risely who just returned from a monthlong mission of mercy in Iraq.

Las Cruces, NM – Join Carrie Hamblen as she talks with Iraq Peace team member Mary Burton Risely who just returned from a monthlong mission of mercy in Iraq.

Join Carrie Hamblen as she talks with Iraq Peace team member Mary Burton Risely who just returned from a monthlong mission of mercy in Iraq.

Las Cruces, NM – Join Carrie Hamblen as she talks with Iraq Peace team member Mary Burton Risely who just returned from a monthlong mission of mercy in Iraq.

Las Cruces, NM – In addition to syringe exchanges there are programs available to heroin users that promote a healthier lifestyle. But law enforcement officials say these programs may not be the best idea.

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NPR News

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

It's one of the nation's great mysteries: The first permanent colony of English settlers in what would become the U.S., founded in North Carolina in 1587 by Sir Walter Raleigh, disappeared three years later with virtually no trace.

Now, archaeologists hope a new search for the Lost Colony will unearth clues about what happened to 117 men, women and children who vanished and were never seen again.

In December, NASA is scheduled to launch the huge, $10 billion James Webb Space Telescope, which is sometimes billed as the successor to the aging Hubble Space Telescope.

The new telescope, the largest and most powerful ever put into space, will travel to a lonely spot a million miles from Earth, where it will be able to peer out into the farthest reaches of the universe.

After a setting-up period of about six months, NASA will unveil the telescope's first images to the public.

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E-mail Viewpoints to: feedback@nmsu.edu

Heinrich Introduces Legislation To Help Students Complete College

17 hours ago

Commentary: U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.) introduced the College Completion Fund Act, landmark legislation to promote college completion in a thoughtful, innovative, and comprehensive way, and address longstanding inequities in college access and success.

Senator Heinrich unveiled the legislation last week during a virtual briefing hosted by the Institute for Higher Education Policy (IHEP), in partnership with TICAS and Results for America, and with support from UnidosUS and Third Way—organizations all dedicated to the success of today’s students and are calling for a once-in-a-generation investment in the College Completion Fund (CCF).

Concerns About University Athletics In New Mexico

17 hours ago


 

  Commentary: When the New Mexico Legislature put additional money in the budget last year to wipe out the debts of the athletic programs at New Mexico State University and the University of New Mexico, it was hoped that the schools would no longer need to put our football teams up as cannon fodder in so-called “money games.”

 

“I’m sick and tired of both universities having to take money games,” said then-Senate Finance Committee Chairman John Arthur Smith. “We’re not competitive, and we’re getting crushed. But they’ve got to play these games to get enough money for their athletic departments.”

Peter Goodman


Commentary: Why can’t the proposed soccer stadium bond be a traditional municipal revenue bond? With a revenue bond, bond holders look to the bond project – not the taxpayers – for payment.

On August 16, the Albuquerque City Council passed resolution R-21-187 which puts the following question on the November 2 ballot: “Shall the City of Albuquerque acquire property for, and to design, develop, erect, construct and otherwise improve a public stadium for multiple uses, including, but not limited to, professional soccer events to be financed by up to $50,000,000 of its gross receipts tax revenue bonds?”

2013 Congressional Map

Commentary: Following each decennial census, the seats in the U.S. House of Representatives are reapportioned so that rapidly growing states gain representation and states with slower growth lose.  Then the states draw new district boundaries (redistricting) to reflect shifts in population within the state.  While New Mexico’s total seats will remain at three, the current Congressional Districts (CDs) have grown at different rates and redistricting is required to keep the three districts about equal in population.  Our large CD 2 District grew the most and will be reduced in size in some way to accommodate the change.  Similarly, legislative and other districts of elected officials have to be adjusted.

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Covering the big stories in New Mexico and Texas. Friday at 1pm on KRWG-FM, call in with your questions on Voice Of The Public with KC Counts.
Join Fred Martino for the region's in-depth television news Thursday at 7pm, Saturday at 5pm and Sunday at 11am on KRWG-TV. E-mail story ideas to feedback@nmsu.edu

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