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The future of DC's beloved cherry blossom tree, Stumpy

The cherry tree nicknamed "Stumpy" stands in high tide water at the Tidal Basin on March 22, 2024 in Washington, DC. The National Park Service announced that it will begin to cut down over 140 Cherry Blossom trees around the Tidal Basin and West Potomac Park in anticipation of construction for an upgraded sea wall to guard against flooding. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)
The cherry tree nicknamed "Stumpy" stands in high tide water at the Tidal Basin on March 22, 2024 in Washington, DC. The National Park Service announced that it will begin to cut down over 140 Cherry Blossom trees around the Tidal Basin and West Potomac Park in anticipation of construction for an upgraded sea wall to guard against flooding. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Washington D.C.’s most famous cherry blossom tree, “Stumpy,” is set to be cut down as rising floodwaters imperil the iconic tidal basin.

The short, grizzled survivor is among the roughly 140 cherry blossom trees that D.C. will eliminate to raise the seawall and walking paths above it by at least two feet.

The National Arboretum is taking clippings of “Stumpy” so its genetic legacy can live on.

Here & Now‘s Scott Tong reports.

Cherry blossom trees line the edge of the walkway, which D.C. is raising to combat the rising tidal basin. (Scott Tong/Here & Now)

Visitors gather to see the famous Stumpy. (Scott Tong/Here & Now)

 

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

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