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Unveiling a new policy after months of controversy and debate over players taking a knee or otherwise making statements during the national anthem, the NFL says all of its athletes and staff "shall stand and show respect for the flag and the Anthem" if they're on the field.

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Expectations for this North Korea nuclear summit are shrinking, it seems.

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Janet Guthrie On Making Indy 500 History

May 23, 2018

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And now to a new segment we're calling Replay - great moments in sports history as remembered by the athletes who were involved; this week, the Indianapolis 500.

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It was supposed to be an honor.

In a ceremony Monday night at the Westin St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco, U.S. soccer great Brandi Chastain was inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame. She was presented with a bronze plaque of her likeness, to be displayed at San Francisco International Airport.

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Updated at 1:30 a.m. ET

"How good can they be? Spoiler alert: Not Very Good."

That was one hockey writer's analysis of the Vegas Golden Knights back in July, not long after the expansion draft in which the brand-new franchise picked its roster from the dregs of other NHL teams. In other words, roughly 10 months before this Not Very Good ™ team (spoiler alert!) made the Stanley Cup final on Sunday.

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And we're going to turn now to hockey and an incredible Cinderella story.

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Dense fog and a soggy track blurred ideal viewing conditions, but there was no mistaking Justify's run to victory in the 143rd running of the Preakness Stakes at Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore.

Entering the race with overwhelming odds, the undefeated favorite, ridden by jockey Mike Smith, shot out of Post 7 with a clean start as he had in Kentucky. Smith takes his second Preakness win.

Saturday Sports: Is Cleveland Done Rocking?

May 19, 2018

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And now it's time for sports.

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Justify is the heavy favorite heading into the 143rd running of the Preakness Stakes at Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore.

While it's a field of eight horses, it's expected to be a two-horse race: Justify and Good Magic.

Justify is a 1-2 favorite for the Preakness. The Kentucky Derby winner drew the seventh post in Saturday's race — the same post he had at the Derby.

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Updated at 9:15 a.m. Thursday.

When an NBA team interviews potential head coaches, it's a big deal on sports sites and the fan blogs. It gets a write-up in the hometown paper.

It's not usually headline news at the New York Times, The Washington Post, Vogue and Salon.

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Now we're going to take a couple minutes to remember a woman who was called the godmother of sumo wrestling.

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Michigan State University has agreed in principle to pay $500 million to settle claims by hundreds of women and girls who say disgraced former sports doctor Larry Nassar abused them.

Under the terms of the agreement, the school will pay $425 million to those 332 current claimants, with $75 million set aside in a trust fund for any future claimants who allege sexual abuse by Nassar.

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What if Bucky Dent's long fly ball in the 1978 American League East playoff game hadn't cleared the Green Monster at Fenway Park? What if John Paxson had missed the 3-pointer at the end of game 6 in the 1993 NBA Finals? What if Carli Lloyd had been injured in the final of the 2015 Women's World Cup?

Sports fans are particularly good at asking what if questions. Sports, after all, are full of counterfactual possibilities replete with drama.

Now that the Supreme Court says it's OK, states are free to legalize betting on sports if they want to. As a once under-the-table economy moves into the open, it creates some large business opportunities — and the potential for millions in new tax revenues.

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It was roughly 43 years ago that Xia Boyu made his first attempt to scale Mount Everest. The Chinese climber had been in his mid-20s, serving in an expedition that came close to the peak before it unraveled under the force of high-altitude storms.

Xia lost his feet to frostbite during that ill-fated effort. Two decades later, he would also lose both legs beneath the knee to lymphoma. But all the while, the double amputee held onto his dream of returning to — and conquering — Everest.

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Updated 2:06 a.m. ET Tuesday

The Supreme Court threw open the door to legalized sports betting on Monday. By a 6-3 vote, the court struck down a 1992 federal law that effectively prevented most states from legalizing sports betting.

"Congress can regulate sports gambling directly, but if it elects not to do so, each State is free to act on its own," the court wrote.

Many consider the running back Jim Brown the greatest American football player ever. But he's known as much more than an athlete — he's an activist, an actor, a thinker and a man with an alleged history of violence against women.

Here's how he's described in the opening paragraph of Dave Zirin's new biography, Jim Brown: Last Man Standing.

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And it's time for sports.

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